skip to Main Content
fortyfivedownstairs, 45 Flinders Lane, Melbourne | 03 9662 9966 | info@fortyfivedownstairs.com

Welcome

  • December 7, 2009
  • news

Welcome to our news page. We'll be using this page to tell you more about our shows and exhibitions, to post photographs, and also to link to some of our favourite sites. We'll post some news soon, in the meantime…

Read More

Alexander Nettlebeck Trio

The Alexander Nettlebeck Trio played in the theatre last night. It was their first gig in their new line up, which comprised pianist Alexander Nettelbeck, bassist Jonathan Zion and drummer Simone White. "Full of life, energetic and undeniably talented, the…

Read More

Thanks for the memory….

There is a review of The Memory Progressive by Chloe Smethurst in The Age today: "DANCE THE MEMORY PROGRESSIVE Phantom Limbs, fortyfivedownstairs, until tomorrow THE fleeting nature of dance, which only exists in the moment of performance, owes a huge…

Read More

Memory Progressive Review #2

Two reviews in one day... not bad for a show that only runs for 4 nights. "The Memory Progressive blends dance movement with theatrical text, animated projections and a blistering score, to examine the aftermath of severe memory loss. Focusing…

Read More

No longer a man in a hurry

"ACTORS are used to playing many different roles, no matter how far from their own personalities. But Samuel Johnson is rehearsing for a role he says contains uncanny echoes of his own life. ''I was born to play this role,''…

Read More

Paper, Scissors, Paint by Mary Edquist

We had a lovely exhibition opening for Mary Edquist's solo exhibition Paper, Scissors, Paint last night. Melbourne based artist Mary Edquist resumed her painting career in 2004 after a long delay. She has worked consistently since that time to establish…

Read More

Arts Hub Review: MEN

A review of our current production of Men from ArtsHub: Men By Shelley Blake ArtsHub | Tuesday, March 16, 2010 There’s something quite raw about Brendan Cowell’s debut play Men, now playing at fortyfivedownstairs. After a brief season in 2009,…

Read More

Congratulations to our Green Room Awards winners

Last night at the Arts Centre Playhouse was a triumph for productions presented at fortyfivedownstairs last year: For their work in Progress and Melancholy (November 2009), Bagryana Popov was awarded Best Director (Independent Theatre) Todd Macdonald (Lopakhin) won Best Actor,…

Read More

MEN in the social pages

MEN in the social pages of The Age. Clockwise: Rush's Catherine McClements, Jay Bowen and Rodger Corser at the premier of MEN; Underbelly star Asher Keddie and MEN director Sarah Hallam; Josef Ber congratulates his Rush co-star Samuel Johnson; Television…

Read More

Capital Idea Review: MEN

The below review is by John Bailey and was posted on his blog, Capital Idea, on Friday 19 March 2010: This one's arriving a little late, but I've been super busy of late with this great new hobby. It involves…

Read More

12 Greenroom nominations

A heartfelt congratulations to all the 2009 Greenroom nominees. We are delighted that three productions seen at fortyfivedownstairs in 2009 have received nominations. Bryant and Frank's Once We Lived Here received 5 nominations, all in the Music Theatre section; +…

Read More

Searchlight Festival is open!

Searchlight Festival opened last night to a very appreciative audience.   The programme continues tonight, with a reading of Sandra Fiona Long's Tyrant with Sharks, followed by a double bill featuring Antoni Jach's Waiting for Isabella and Wes Snelling and Benn…

Read More

Arts Hub Review: Nature as History

"Nature as History is a series of new photographs by Imogen Barraga Hall. Her 7th solo show, Imogen has been taking photographs since 2005 after her house tragically burnt down in rural NSW. But proving that something good can come…

Read More

More Searchlight photos…

Benn Bennett and Wes Snelling in Black Bag. (Note the sparkly 'Ken Done' pants in the 3rd photo.. just luverly) Jodee Mundy, Mal Webb and Francesca Waters in Sandra Fiona Long's Tyrant with Sharks Ellie Nielson in Waiting for Isabella…

Read More

Searchlight: The Home Stretch and Directors Cut

Sally Smith in Director’s Cut The fortyfivedownstairs foyer as Sally Smith lead the crowd into the theatre for Director’s Cut. David Wells in Director’s Cut David Wells in Director’s Cut Sally Smith in Director’s Cut Sally Smith in Director’s Cut…

Read More

The Memory Progressive

The Memory Progressive by Phantom Limbs opens tonight at 8pm to a full house. See more gorgeous images and information about the show on Phantom Limbs' blog. Tickets are $23/$18, and are available to purchase here.

Read More

Nora Wompi's opening

Sir Andrew Grimwade opens the exhibition. Gerard Vaughan, director of the NGV; Nora Wompi, artist; Sir Andrew Grimwade, Chairman, The Felton Bequest. Nora Wompi and Suzanne O'Connell Nora Wompi's exhibition in the fortyfivedownstairs gallery. Furniture by Schiavello.

Read More

Now accepting proposals for 2011

We have just added our proposals forms for 2011 to both the gallery and theatre pages of our website.  Which means of course we are now accepting exhibition and theatre proposals for next year. Bear in mind when putting in…

Read More

Judas Iscariot review by Shelley Blake

Review from Arts Hub, written by Shelley Blake:

One of history’s most famous apparent betrayals has been brought to the Melbourne stage in Stephen Adly Guirgis’s 1995 production The last days of Judas Iscariot – and it seems quite fitting that a company called Human Sacrifice Theatre would be the ones to bring it home. After all it is a tale about sacrifice and redemption, isn’t it?

The production, now playing at Fortyfive downstairs, is cleverly crafted and set in the court room of “down town” purgatory. The case, God and the kingdom of heaven and earth vs Judas Iscariot, opens with a grasping monologue from Judas’s mother, Henrietta Iscariot (Gail Beker) and as the audience seems settled in their juror’s chairs, the drama begins.

A dialogue driven performance allows the cast to jump back and forth between stories, anecdotes and tales of their time and relationship with the one and only Judas Iscariot. At times, the character’s lack deliverance in their monologues and the persecution sits a little too softly on the surface.

Read More

Othello: Moor than the role of a lifetime

Article by Michelle Griffin, published in The Age, 7 June 2010:

AS A 1.9-metre-tall Tongan, 27-year-old actor Anthony Taufa is very conscious of resisting typecasting. ”I’ve always said I’m more than a security guard,” says Taufa, who has just graduated from NIDA’s prestigious acting course.

”I want to show the world that Islanders are as liberal and complex as any other nationality in Australia. ”I do want vulnerable roles, I do want to be in love, to do romantic leads.”

But there is one role Taufa happily accepts as his lot in life: Othello, the Moor of Venice. At 27, he is about to play the 50-something soldier for the fourth time, as the lead in The Kingsmen’s production at fortyfivedownstairs.

Read More

Review: Othello by The Kingsmen

Below is a review of Othello by The Kingsmen, written by Liza Dezfouli for Australian Stage Online.  See the original review here.

Othello | The Kingsmen
Written by Liza Dezfouli
Thursday, 10 June 2010 11:02

The geometric 90s looking set design tell you immediately that you’re in for something new and different with this production of Othello. The windows of the theatre space at 45 Downstairs are festooned with tapes of black and primary colours, suggesting the bars of a prison, the narrow window openings of a castle, or the timbers of a ship. Lighting is simple and there are few props. The action happens on the bodies of the actors, tightly choreographed into a piece that at times almost veers into dance. The actors tumble and roll; there is clowning and buffoonery a-plenty. The extensive development of a vocabulary of body language provides an original and vivacious aspect to this presentation of Othello’s dark story. The marrying of Shakespeare to physical theatre is an ambitious undertaking with a whole new level of performance to keep track of along with the demands of the language. It does make for a particular effort from the audience and, although the physical aspect is meticulously designed to support the script, the clowning is at times distracting; it may be that the cast hadn’t quite settled into the form and was having to work hard to deliver the story on so many levels.

Read More

Patricia Cornelius on Australian Stage Online

An article about Patricia Cornelius and her upcoming play Do not go gentle... from Australian Stage Online, written by Trevar Alan Chilver.  See it in it's original context here. Dreams, Visions and Constipated Old Farts Images of an ageing Ghandi…

Read More
Back To Top
×Close search
Search