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Gods and Demons

From 'Pictures at an Exhibition' to 'Java Suite', from 'Islamey' to Piazzolla’s Tango, Chinese born pianist Yiyun Gu brings fantastic gods and demons together in a concert of magic and high imagination.
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Shepherd on the Rock

A concert of works for saxophone, piano and mezzo-soprano, including a transcription of Schubert’s late masterpiece, and a selection of beautiful original works.
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As One

One of the major works of American opera in the 21st century has its Australian premiere as part of the 2020 Midsumma Festival.
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Three of a Kind

Three jazz pianists. Two generations. One family. Three family members; brothers Colin and Ted Nettelbeck, and Colin’s son Alexander Nettelbeck, perform together in a return concert at fortyfivedownstairs.
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FLY – a chamber opera

Melbourne’s award-winning, boutique opera company, Lyric, presents this Australian work about Lawrence Hargrave: explorer, engineer, inventor and the man on the twenty dollar note.
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The Age review of The Ghetto Cabaret

Cameron Woodhead August 7, 2019 — 2.11pm   ★★★★ A cabaret set amid the horror and deprivation of Jewish ghettoes in World War II? You’d have to be crazy. Totally meshugah. Yet Galit Klas has created one of the most…

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Sepharad

Dancer Tomas Arroquero and guitarist Kieren Ray work with Israeli born oud player, Yuval Ashkar, in a collaboration that revisits the Moorish connections with Flamenco in the inaugural performance of an exciting new project.
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ABR review of A Room of One’s Own

Wednesday, 24 July 2019 Lisa Gorton ★★★★ In this intelligent and unusual play, director Peta Hanrahan arranges Virginia Woolf’s great essay A Room of One’s Own into an hour-long play for four voices. Curiously, perhaps, it works so well as…

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BROKEN by Mary Anne Butler

The Victorian premiere of Mary Anne Butler’s poetic, evocative play. Winner of the Victorian Premier’s Literary Award for Drama, the Northern Territory Literary Award for Best Script and the Victorian Prize for Literature.
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The Rapture

Moira Finucane's The Rapture writhes through a visual feast of prophecy, Gothic dreams, birds of prey, soaring wings, apocalyptic fairy tales, soul-searing music and physical madness.
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Whiteley's Incredible Blue

'Dickins' distinctive, poetic script is rendered truly memorable by Pigot's nuanced, chameleon-like performance.' Kate Herbert - four stars in the Herald Sun read review here. What lies inside the imaginations of an artist and addict? The capricious genius of Brett…

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Urban Display Suite

Urban Display Suite is a deliciously malicious musical satire on our national obsession with the property market. With Melbourne houses the most overvalued in the world, our city is awash with tandoori tanned real estate agents, tasteless architecture and boring…

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Bare Witness clip

Here is a youtube clip of Bare Witness by Mari Lourey, directed by Nadja Kostich. Bare Witness ran at fortyfivedownstairs from 10 - 26 September 2010.

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Laneway Magazine: My Name is Rachel Corrie

This review of My Name is Rachel Corrie was written by Jeremy Williams for Laneway Magazine on 11 November 2010. See it in its original context here.

My Name is Rachel Corrie
fortyfivedownstairs
November 4 – 14, 2010

For those who have followed the ongoing Israel-Palestine conflict the name Rachel Corrie may well ring a bell, for others the name will be as meaningless as Joe Bloggs and Paula Brown. However, this one-woman production compiled by Alan Rickman (of Harry Potter fame) and Katharine Viner (deputy editor of The Guardian) is ensuring that Corrie’s legacy is not forgotten. On January 22nd 2003, the 23 year old American student flew to Israel to work as a volunteer for International Solidarity Movement, the pacifist Palestinian protest organisation. Less than two months later, Corrie was killed in the name of her cause when an Israeli bulldozer crushed her to death as she defended a Palestinian home.

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The Age: My Name is Rachel Corrie

This review of My Name is Rachel Corrie was written by Cameron Woodhead and published in The Age on Tuesday 9 November 2010. See it in its original context here. By Rachel Corrie, edited by Katharine Viner & Alan Rickman,…

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My name is Rachel Corrie in The Age

This article about My Name is Rachel Corrie was written by Liza Power and published in The Age on Saturday 30 October 2010. See it in its original context here. An idealistic life remembered Liza Power October 30, 2010 Image:…

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Review: Carnival of Mysteries on Oz Baby Boomers

This review of Carnival of Mysteries was written by Christine Hill and published on Oz Baby Boomers on Saturday 16 October 2010. See it in its original context here.

The Carnival of Mysteries, created and directed by Moira Finucane & Jackie Smith

fortyfivedownstairs, Melbourne | Until 30 October

Step right up folks. Be amazed, be surprised, be thoroughly entertained by this extraordinary spectacle, created and directed by Moira Finucane and Jackie Smith, and brought to you by the Melbourne International Arts Festival and fortyfive downstairs.

Finucane and Smith’s trademark mix of provocation and entertainment starts in the theatre lobby where, on arrival, everyone is rubber stamped, issued a ‘passport’, and given 30,000 carnival dollars. A suitably sleazy spruiker (David Pidd) explains the rules to the bemused but eager audience-in-waiting before we troop down the stairs to enter the world of the Carnival.

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Review: Bare Witness on Trip the Light Fantastick

This review of Bare Witness was written by David Maney for Trip the Light Fantastick. See it in its original context here.

I was always susceptible to liking Mari Lourey’s new play, Bare Witness. What with an interest in areas of conflict; that I’d just re-read Hare & Brent’s Pravda and an equally scathing depiction of journalism in a friend’s new play that is the glorious bastard child of Hare, Brent, Stoppard and Beckett; I was almost certain to be provoked. But where BW differs is that its focus is the corruption of the image, not words. Whereas the latter can be nimble and conjure the trick of “truth” in front of eyes — hearing how it’s done behind the by-line would deflate anyone insistent on objectivity — an image is supposed to be bare A camera is a witness, a machine that doesn’t need to decipher right from wrong. But this is not true either.


Photo by Marg Horwell

The camera makes everyone a tourist in other people’s reality, and eventually in one’s own. – Susan Sontag

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Review: Bare Witness on Man About Town

This review of Bare Witness was written by Richard Watts for Man About Town. See it in its original context here.

A rare collaboration between two of Melbourne’s most important creative spaces, Mari Lourey’s Bare Witness is a joint presentation by La Mama Theatre and fortyfivedownstairs, in the latter organisation’s bunker-like venue beneath Flinders Lane. The space suits the work admirably, for Bare Witness is an expressionistic exploration of the experiences of a diverse group of photojournalists in three different war zones: Bosnia in the early 1990s, Timor Leste in the dark days before its independence from Indonesia, and contemporary Iraq.

The audience’s introduction to this blood, developing fluid and adrenaline-soaked world is Australian photographer Dani Hill (Daniela Farinacci), who in a short space of time goes from snapping hats and frocks at Flemington race course to photographing corpses and grieving widows in the Balkans. Years later, Dani looks back through her old photographs, recalling the stories behind the 11 most powerful shots; stories which are then played out for the audience, counting down slowly to the traumatic revelation behind the final, heartbreaking photograph.

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